UCLA Integrated Substance Abuse Programs (ISAP) Program Evaluation Services
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Project Team


Principal Investigator:
Nena Messina, Ph.D.
(nmessina@.ucla.edu)

 

Project Director:
Kira Jeter, M.P.H.

Funding Period


January 2013 to September 2014

 

Criminal Justice

DOJ Second Chance Reentry Program for Adult Offenders with Co-Occurring Substance Abuse and Mental Health Disorders

The Adult Reentry Comprehensive Services (ARCS) project aimed to expand pre- and post-release re-entry treatment services for medium to high risk adult offenders to support post-release re-integration. Performance objectives were to increase substance abuse, mental, and behavioral health treatment services for offenders with co-occurring disorders (COD) in jail and in the community and provide services to 120 participants over the 2-year grant period. The outcome objectives were to reduce symptoms of COD, increase long-term housing, increase employment, and reduce recidivism. Evaluation objectives were two-fold: (1) monitor the implementation of the planned intervention, and (2) measure observed changes in participants from before to after their participation in the project in the domains of COD symptoms, long-term housing, employment/volunteer status, program completion/termination, recidivism (i.e., re-arrest and/or return to custody), treatment adherence,  and  services received.

DOJ Second Chance Re-entry Program for Adult Offenders was funded by Los Angeles County, contract PH-001733, from January 2013 to September 2014.

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Project Team


Principal Investigator:
Darren Urada (durada@ucla.edu)

Funding Period


January 2008 to December 2010

 

 

Project Publications:


Prop. 36 Reports

Evaluation of California's Prop. 36

In November 2000, California voters passed Proposition 36 (also known as “Prop. 36,” or the “Substance Abuse and Crime Prevention Act”), which allows adults convicted of nonviolent, drug-related offenses who meet certain eligibility requirements to receive probation with drug treatment in lieu of standard sentencing. UCLA ISAP has been evaluating Prop. 36 since January 2001 (see http://www.uclaisap.org/Prop36/html/reports.html).

The Prop. 36 evaluation has focused on identifying ways to improve the program, understanding special populations, and comparing Prop. 36 populations and outcomes to those found in the broader criminal justice treatment system.

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Evaluation of Female Offender Treatment and Employment Program (FOTEP)

The goal of the FOTEP project was to enable the successful reintegration of women parolees into the community, particularly in regard to reducing criminal behavior, substance use, and welfare dependence, and to strengthen family relationships and employment skills. The FOTEP evaluation study consisted of a quasi-experimental study with a sample of FOTEP participants (n = 343) and a Comparison group of eligible, but non-participating, female parolees (n = 157). All participants initially participated in in-prison substance abuse treatment; about two thirds of the sample then transferred to community-based treatment in FOTEP, while the others were paroled to the community and referred to treatment as usual. A 12-month follow-up interview was conducted with about 90% of the study sample from 2001-2003 and outcomes were assessed regarding their drug use, criminal behavior, employment, parental status, and psychosocial functioning. Recidivism (i.e., return-to-prison) was also analyzed for up to 48 months following parole using administrative data. Analyses have shown that longer time in FOTEP treatment (at least 150 days) reduced the likelihood of a return to prison by about half, and that individuals who completed FOTEP treatment were significantly less likely to return to prison as compared with individuals in the Comparison group.

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Project Team


Principal Investigator:
Christine E. Grella  (grella@ucla.edu)

Project Director:
Luz Rodriguez  (luz@ucla.edu)


Funding Period


October 2006 to September 2009

Evaluation of the Liberating Our Families from Drugs and Incarceration Program

ISAP conducted the evaluation of the SAMHSA-funded program “Liberating our Families from Drugs and Incarceration (LOFFDI),” which is part of the Pregnant and Parenting Women’s Treatment Initiative at the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment. The LOFFDI program was provided at the Walden House program in El Monte, CA, and it aimed to assist women parolees as they reintegrated into the community and to reunify them with their children and other family members.

The program’s objectives were to improve the mental and physical health status and employability of participants, as well as the overall psychosocial functioning of participants and their families, and thereby reduce the risk of relapse to substance abuse and criminal behavior. The program provided intensive case management services within the context of residential substance abuse treatment, which included family counseling, parenting skills training, vocational services, mental health services, and trauma-related services.

The site-specific evaluation was designed to collect data on the relevant background characteristics of this sample and their level of functioning in the outcome domains that were targeted by the intervention. In addition, the evaluation conducted site visit observations of project implementation and focus groups with project participants.

Follow-up interviews with participants assessed their satisfaction with the services received in LOFFDI, in addition to changes in the relevant outcome domains (i.e., substance use, physical and mental health status, employment status, family functioning, criminal behavior, pregnancy and child-related outcomes).

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Project Team


Principal Investigator:
David Farabee (dfarabee@ucla.edu)

Project Director:
Joy Yang


Funding Period


July 2002 to June 2008

Evaluation of the Mental Health Services Continuum Program

To enhance the California Department of Corrections’ ability to identify and treat mentally ill parolees, the Mental Health Services Continuum Program (MHSCP) was developed by the Parole and Community Services Division (P&CSD) in July of 2000. The purpose of the MHSCP was to enhance the quality and timeliness of mental health services provided to mentally ill parolees after release, with the overarching goal of reducing recidivism and improving public safety. The evaluation of the MHSCP was a 4-year initiative (July 1, 2002, through June 30, 2006). The purpose of the evaluation was to answer the following: (1) How well were the in-prison and community-based components planned, developed, and implemented? (2) What problems were encountered and how were they addressed? and (3) What impact did the MHSCP program have on recidivism of mentally ill parolees?

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Project Team


Principal Investigator:
Angela Hawken


Co-Investigator:
Mark Kleiman (kleiman@ucla.edu)

Project Director:
Elizabeth Evans (laevans@ucla.edu)


Funding Period


July 2007 to June 2008

Swiftness and Certainty in Enforcing Probation Conditions:  Hawaii's H.O.P.E. Program

While most experts agree that the probation system should be reformed, policy makers need real-world evidence of the effectiveness of different approaches to probation before they act. Hawaii offered an opportunity to test whether a more strategic approach to probation and parole can lead to better outcomes. The goal of this project was to evaluate Hawaii’s Opportunity Probation with Enforcement (HOPE) program. HOPE involved regular random drug testing with swift and certain but modest sanctions for every drug-positive urinalysis  or probation violation. The design and implementation of HOPE focused on personal responsibility and accountability and included a timely mechanism (sanctions were imposed immediately) and modest sanctions (typically two days in jail, but terms increased for continued non-compliance) for dealing with probation violations. The original pilot of HOPE was highly successful–with reductions of more than 80% in rates of noncompliance and large reductions in recidivism and therefore public-sector costs. This project entailed an outcome evaluation, process evaluation, and cost analysis of the HOPE project as implemented in the Special Probation Unit for high-risk drug-involved probationers (primarily methamphetamine users) in Honolulu.

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