ISAP in the News (2011-2013)

Compiled by UCLA Health Sciences Media Relations.

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2013

High-Priced Malibu Treatment Centers

Dr. Richard Rawson, professor of psychiatry and associate director of the Integrated Substance Abuse Programs at the Semel Institute, was quoted in a Sept. 13 New York Times article about the popularity of drug and alcohol rehabilitation facilities in Malibu, Calif:

“’How do the high-end facilities and their patented mind/body/soul regimens stack up against bare-bones programs? “There’s absolutely no evidence to suggest they’re more successful,’ said Richard Rawson, associate director of Integrated Substance Abuse Programs at the University of California, Los Angeles. ‘There’s nothing wrong with having fun things for patients to do, but to call yoga or surfing evidence-based therapy is ludicrous.’”

From: http://www.nytimes.com/2013/09/15/fashion/an-intervention-for-malibu.html?pagewanted=all

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Sending Nonviolent Drug Offenders to Treatment Instead of Prison Saves Money

ScienceBlogs covered the publication of a new ISAP study regarding findings on the cost savings of California’s Substance Abuse and Crime Prevention Act (Proposition 36):

“In a new study published in the June issue of the American Journal of Public Health (AJPH), researchers found that California’s Substance Abuse and Crime Prevention Act, which diverts nonviolent drug offenders from the correctional system and into treatment, saved a little more than $2,300 per offender over a 30-month post-conviction period. In fact, researchers estimated more than $97 million in savings for the 42,000 offenders affected during the first year of the law’s implementation. And even though the law resulted in spending more on treatment, health care services and community service supervision, bypassing incarceration still yielded overall savings, said study co-author M. Douglas Anglin, founding director of the UCLA Drug Abuse Research Center and [former] associate director of the university’s Integrated Substance Abuse Programs.”

From: http://scienceblogs.com/thepumphandle/2013/05/24/study-sending-nonviolent-drugs-offenders-to-treatment-instead-of-prison-saves-money/

Anglin, M.D., Nosyk, B., Jaffe, A., Urada, D., & Evans, E. (2013) Offender diversion into substance use disorder treatment: The economic impact of California’s Proposition 36. American Journal of Public Health, 103(6), 1096-1102.


2012

ISAP Develops New Patient-Oriented Instrument to Assess Treatment & Recovery

The fields of addiction medicine and addiction research have long sought an efficient yet comprehensive instrument to assess patient progress in treatment and recovery. Traditional tools are expensive, time consuming, complex, and based on topics that clinicians or researchers think are important. Thus, they typically do not provide patient-centered information that is meaningful and relevant to the lives of patients with substance use disorders. To improve our ability to understand patients’ progress in treatment from their perspectives, the authors and colleagues developed a patient-oriented assessment instrument that has considerable advantages over existing instruments: brevity, simplicity, ease of administration, orientation to the patient, and cost (none). The resulting Treatment Effectiveness Assessment (TEA) elicits patient responses that help the patient and the clinician quickly gauge patient progress in treatment and in recovery, according to the patients’ sense of what is important within four domains established by prior research. Patients provide both numerical responses and representative details on their substance use, health, lifestyle, and community. No software is required for data entry or scoring, and no formal training is required to administer the TEA. This article describes the development of the TEA and the initial phases of its application in clinical practice and in research.

Ling, W., Farabee, D., Liepa, D., & Wu, L.T. (2012). The Treatment Effectiveness Assessment (TEA): An efficient, patient-centered instrument for evaluating progress in recovery from addiction. Substance Abuse and Rehabilitation, 2012(3), 129-136.

To read the full article, visit:
http://www.dovepress.com/the-treatment-effectiveness-assessment-tea-an-efficient-patient-center-peer-reviewed-article-SAR

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The Push for Medical Approaches to Treating Addiction

ISAP Director Walter Ling, MD, was interviewed for a Los Angeles Times article Sept. 22 regarding the push for recognition of addiction as a disease and more medical approaches to treating substance abuse.

“Treatment for addicts is starting to change”
By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times, Sept. 22, 2012
http://www.latimes.com/news/science/la-sci-addiction-meds-20120922,0,5288949.story

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Five Damaging Myths about Addiction

CNN.com ran a column Sept. 14 by Adi Jaffe, a postdoctoral fellow with UCLA's Integrated Substance Abuse Programs, addressing common misconceptions about drug addiction and addicts.

CNN.com
http://www.cnn.com/2012/09/13/health/jaffe-addiction-myths/index.html

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Efficacy of Detoxification and Rehab Programs

Richard Rawson, professor of psychiatry and an associate director of the Integrated Substance Abuse Programs at the Semel Institute, was quoted in an August 1 Reuters article about the efficacy of detoxification and rehabilitation programs for methamphetamine users.

Reuters
http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/08/01/us-detox-rehab-idUSBRE8700WJ20120801

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Therapy via the Telephone for Depression

Suzette Glasner-Edwards, a research psychologist at the Integrated Substance Abuse Programs at the Semel Institute, was quoted June 5 by the Huffington Post  and June 9 in a Webpronews.com article about the use of therapy via telephone to assist people suffering from depression.

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UCLA Helps Iraq Cope with Drug Abuse

Richard Rawson, professor of psychiatry and associate director of ISAP at the Semel Institute, was featured April 28 in a Daily Star (Lebanon) newspaper article about a partnership between Iraqi and Lebanese clinicians and UCLA aimed at combating the growing drug abuse problem in Iraq.

“Lebanese experts training Iraqi team to treat drug addiction”
April 28, 2012, By Alex Taylor, The Daily Star
http://www.dailystar.com.lb/News/Local-News/2012/Apr-28/171706-lebanese-experts-training-iraqi-team-to-treat-drug-addiction.ashx#ixzz1twfsxaEt

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Oregon's Efforts to Combat Methamphetamine

A study by Mary-Lynn Brecht, adjunct professor of nursing and a researcher with UCLA ISAP at the Semel Institute, was cited in a Feb. 22, 2012, Oregonian article assessing Oregon's effort to combat methamphetamine.

From the article:

…Furthermore, a new study by Jane Carlisle Maxwell of the University of Texas at Austin and Mary-Lynn Brecht of the University of California at Los Angeles found that Mexican meth manufacturers (in a country that imposed a ban on pseudoephedrine in 2008) are increasingly using alternative methods to make the drug, including the P2P method, which doesn't rely on pseudoephedrine.

In addition, Maxwell and Brecht pointed to findings from the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration, which indicate that Mexican meth cooks are "looking to other areas in the world for the required chemicals and the ability of Asian manufacturers who use ephedrine and pseudoephedrine to produce large quantities of high-quality methamphetamine, which may become another source of the drug in the U.S."

But independent of the new realities in the manufacturing of methamphetamine, Oregon's own High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area reported in September 2011 that meth continues to be "highly available" and remains "the most serious drug threat in Oregon." Findings by Maxwell, Brecht and the anti-drug-trafficking program are consistent with Cascade's conclusions….

“Oregon’s cold medicine restriction: Rule trips the law-abiding, fails to curb meth problem”
http://www.oregonlive.com/opinion/index.ssf/2012/02/oregons_cold_medicine_restrict.html


2011

The Importance of Social Support in Preventing Relapse to Meth Use

Richard Rawson, professor of psychiatry and an associate director of ISAP at the Semel Institute, was quoted Nov. 27 by Associated Press about an Oklahoma woman, Lynette Moreau, who turned her life around after 20 years as an intravenous methamphetamine user.

From the article:

…An expert in meth addiction said Moreau is in the minority of people who can get off the drug and stay off.

About a quarter to a third of those who quit the drug are able to stay clean for extended periods — a success rate similar to those for alcohol, cigarettes and cocaine, said University of California at Los Angeles psychiatry professor Richard Rawson, who runs several international studies on meth addiction funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse.

"The difficult part with methamphetamines isn't stopping, it's not relapsing," he said. Support is a key to long-term success.

"To the extent that you can surround yourself with people who are supportive and sober and living productive lives, you're going to have better outcomes," Rawson said.

“After 20 years on meth, woman becomes professor”
http://www.ctpost.com/news/article/After-20-years-on-meth-woman-becomes-professor-2295921.php

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SAMHSA Awards Grant to ISAP for Substance Abuse Prevention in Iraq

As reported in Newswise.com, Richard A. Rawson, associate director of UCLA ISAP, has been awarded a grant to support efforts to develop substance abuse services in Iraq.

Newswise — The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), in collaboration with the U.S. State Department’s Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs (State/INL), has awarded the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) a $770,000 grant to support efforts to develop substance abuse services in Iraq. The funds are provided by the State Department under an interagency agreement with SAMHSA to support the Iraqi Demand Reduction Initiative.

UCLA will use the funds to help the Iraqi Ministry of Health establish a Center of Excellence on Substance Abuse Services at Baghdad’s Medical City Complex. The center will build substance abuse service capacity in the country by training a core group of Iraqi medical professionals on service system development and the latest strategies in substance abuse treatment including the screening, brief intervention and referral to treatment (SBIRT) approach and medication-assisted therapy.

“This is an exciting, innovative international collaboration that holds tremendous promise for the people of Iraq and the behavioral health field,” said SAMHSA Administrator Pamela S. Hyde. “The Iraqi people will benefit from a system in place that saves lives from the ravages of addiction and the U.S. behavioral health field will benefit from the lessons learned in creating a new integrated behavioral health system.” Information about UCLA’s Integrated Substance Abuse Programs is available at http://uclaisap.org/

See also the Oct. 26 UCLA Daily Bruin article:

“Grant helps UCLA Integrated Substance Abuse Program establish drug and alcohol rehabilitation, research center in Iraq”

http://www.dailybruin.com/index.php/article/2011/10/grant_helps_ucla_integrated_substance_abuse_
program_establish_drug_and_alcohol_rehabilitation_resear

For additional information about SAMHSA and its programs, visit http://www.samhsa.gov/.

http://www.newswise.com/articles/samhsa-awards-grant-to-ucla-for-substance-abuse-prevention-in-iraq

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New Treatment Strategies for Schizophrenia

A study by Stephen Marder, professor of psychiatry at the UCLA Semel Institute and chief of the UCLA Veterans Administration Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, Alison Hamilton, a research anthropologist at UCLA ISAP, and others was featured in an Oct. 22 New York Times article about new treatment strategies for people living with schizophrenia.

“A High-Profile Executive Job as Defense Against Mental Ills”

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/10/23/health/23lives.html?_r=3

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Parental Drug Abuse

Richard A. Rawson, professor of psychiatry and associate director of ISAP at the UCLA Semel Institute, was quoted Oct. 3 by the Des Moines Register about a child custody case involving allegations of parental drug use.

From the article:

Iowa experts once cautioned that meth was the most addictive illicit hard drug on the market. But some top experts in treating drug addiction now believe meth addiction is treatable, like addictions to other hard drugs such as cocaine.

Professor Richard Rawson, associate director of integrated substance abuse programs at the University of California-Los Angeles, has said it takes no longer to treat meth than other addictions.

“‘We're going to ... take Elliot’”
http://dmjuice.desmoinesregister.com/article/20111003/NEWS01/310030023/1001/NEWS

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Betty Ford’s Influence on the Substance Abuse Field

Richard Rawson, professor of psychiatry at the UCLA Semel Institute and an associate director of ISAP, was quoted July 9 by Associated Press about Betty Ford’s influence on the substance abuse field.

"It's hard to imagine a more important figure in the substance abuse field than Mrs. Ford," Rick Rawson, associate director of the integrated substance abuse program at the University of California at Los Angeles, said at the time (of former President Gerald Ford’s death in 2006).

“Former US First Lady Betty Ford Dies at 93”
http://www.stuff.co.nz/world/americas/5261057/Former-US-first-lady-Betty-Ford-dies-at-93

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The Effects of Methamphetamine on One’s Appearance

Larissa Mooney, assistant professor of psychiatry at the Semel Institute and ISAP, was quoted in a Feb. 25 MSNBC article about a documentary aimed at stopping teens from using methamphetamine by showing them how the drug affects one's appearance.

From the article:

The gaunt look on many of the addicts can be the result of poor nutrition and lack of sleep, says Dr. Larissa Mooney, an addiction psychiatrist and an assistant clinical professor of psychiatry at the University of California, Los Angeles.

As for the facial sores: Sometimes meth users will hallucinate and get the sensation that there are bugs crawling under their skin, Mooney says. Trying to get relief, they’ll sometimes pick at their skin until there are open sores.

Experts can’t say whether the program will work, but Mooney and [Thomas] McLellan [director of the Center for Substance Abuse Solutions at the University of Pennsylvania] are hopeful.

“The video is trying to tap into something that is important to young people,” Mooney says. “It’s less abstract than telling someone they’ll get lung cancer many years down the line. This is something you can actually see right now.”

“Shocking Mug Shots Reveal Toll of Drug Abuse”
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/41787410/ns/health-addictions/

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ISAP Professor Comments on California Attorney General’s Promise to Reform Criminal Justice System

David Farabee, professor of psychiatry at ISAP, was quoted Jan. 3 by Associated Press about Kamala Harris, the first woman and first minority to serve as California's attorney general.

From the article:

[Harris] told hundreds of supporters that she will be an innovator who will be smart on crime as well as tough on crime.

"Being smart on crime is about doing more preventing and less reacting," she said, promising to target chronic truancy and the underlying causes of criminal behavior as she did during two terms as San Francisco district attorney….

University of California, Los Angeles psychiatry professor David Farabee applauded Harris' reform agenda, although he said the criminal justice system is tough to change. Farabee is the author of "Rethinking Rehabilitation: Why Can't We Reform Our Criminals?"

"The promising aspect of this is she's at least acknowledging there's a need for change and innovation," he said. "How easy that is, is a different question."

“California Swears in First Female Attorney General”
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=%2Fn%2Fa%2F2011%2F01%2F03%2Fstate%2Fn151458S80.DTL


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