ISAP in the News (2014-2015)

Compiled by UCLA Health Sciences Media Relations.

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2015

Captagon Use and War in the Middle East
Richard Rawson, professor of psychiatry at the Semel Institute and co-director of UCLA’s Integrated Substance Abuse Programs, was quoted Dec. 9 in a New York Magazine article about Captagon, a controversial amphetamine-based substance making headlines recently as the supposed drug of choice for Islamic State militants and other fighters in Syria’s civil war.

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Alleged Defrauding of California’s Drug Medi-Cal System for Addiction Rehabilitation Services
Richard Rawson, professor of psychiatry at the Semel Institute and co-director of the UCLA Integrated Substance Abuse Programs, commented Nov. 12 in a CNN.com article on about a racket that is alleged to have defrauded California's Drug Medi-Cal system of close to $100 million in fraudulent claims for addiction recovery services.

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The Benefit of Incentives in Helping Patients Make Smarter Health Choices

Suzette Glasner-Edwards, an adjunct associate professor at the Semel Institute and a research psychologist in the Integrated Substance Abuse Programs, commented Nov. 12 in a CBSNews.com article that explored the benefits of providing patients with incentives to make smarter health choices.

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“Kicking an addiction? Replace it with joy”

Suzette Glasner-Edwards’  new book, Addiction Recovery Skills Workbook: Changing Addictive Behaviors Using CBT, Mindfulness and Motivational Interviewing Techniques, which is coming out in December, was featured in the UCLA Newsroom.  See “Kicking an addiction? Replace it with joy, UCLA expert advises in new book: Bringing pleasure into recovery is the key to turning over a new leaf.” The book was also highlighted in the Nov. 27 Beverly Hills Courier.

Dr. Glasner-Edwards is an adjunct associate professor at UCLA’s Semel Institute for Neuroscience and a researcher at ISAP.

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An Overview of the Synthetic Drug “Spice”

Dr. Larissa Mooney, an associate clinical professor of psychiatry and director of the UCLA Addiction Medicine Clinic, gave an overview of the drug “spice” on KCRW’s Press Play on Oct. 16. The drug has been the target of a number of recent large raids by law enforcement.

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Dramatic Rise in Marijuana Use in the Past Decade

Dr. Mooney also commented Oct. 21 in a CBSNews.com article about a dramatic rise in marijuana use among U.S. adults in the past decade.

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The Connection Between Alcoholism and Depression

Dr. Larissa Mooney, an associate professor of psychiatry at the Semel Institute and director of the UCLA Addiction Medicine Clinic, was quoted Sept. 25 in the New York Times and Sept. 30 in the Bend Bulletin in articles about the connection between alcoholism and depression.

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Brain Activity Behind the Savoring of Positive Emotions

Dr. Suzette Glasner-Edwards, an adjunct associate professor of psychiatry in the Semel Institute and clinical psychologist with Integrated Substance Abuse Programs, was quoted Sept. 24 in a U.S. News & World Report story about new research into the brain activity behind the savoring of positive emotions.

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New Push from White House to Combat Heroin Addiction

Dr. Walter Ling, professor of psychiatry and founding director of the UCLA Integrated Substance Abuse Programs, was quoted Aug.19 in a Los Angeles Times article about a new push from the White House to combat the nation’s growing problem with heroin addiction.

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FDA’s Approval of OxyContin for Children as Young as 11

Dr. Larissa Mooney, an associate clinical professor of psychiatry in the Semel Institute, director of the UCLA Addiction Medicine Clinic, and member of UCLA ISAP, was quoted Aug. 23 in a Tampa Tribune article about concerns around the FDA’s recent approval of OxyContin for use in children as young as 11. 

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Methamphetamine Addiction Rises in Texas

Dr. Mary-Lynn Brecht, a researcher and statistical support specialist for the UCLA Integrated Substance Abuse Programs, was quoted July 26 in a Texas Tribune article about a rise in methamphetamine addiction in Texas.

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Addiction Newsletter Reports on Addiction Prediction

Dr. Steven Shoptaw, a professor of family medicine at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and a professor of psychiatry at the Semel Institute; Dr. Matthew Worley, a postdoctoral scholar in the department of family medicine; and Dr. Walter Ling, a professor of psychiatry at the Semel Institute and former director of UCLA Integrated Substance Abuse Programs, penned an article in the April 27 edition of the American Society of Addiction Medicine newsletter. The manuscript was based on research conducted at UCLA on the use of behavioral economics to predict opioid use during prescription opioid dependence treatment.

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The Benefits and Dangers of Benzodiazapines

Dr. Larissa Mooney, assistant professor of psychiatry at the Semel Institute, member of the UCLA Integrated Substance Abuse Programs at the Semel Institute, and director, UCLA Addiction Medicine Clinic, was quoted in a Feb. 19 U.S.News & World Report health segment about the class of drugs called benzodiazapines, which are useful for the treatment of acute anxiety and insomnia, but that can also be addictive.

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Risks of Alcohol, Marijuana, and Other Drugs

Dr. Larissa Mooney, assistant professor of psychiatry at the Semel Institute, and director of the Addiction Medicine Clinic; Dr. Charles S. Grob, professor of psychiatry; and Dr. Mark Kleiman, a professor of public policy at the Luskin School of Public Affairs, were all featured in a Feb. 25 Vox.com article about the risks of alcohol, marijuana, and other drugs.

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2014

Good Morning America Looks at the Phenomenon of “Second Addictions”

Dr. Larissa Mooney, assistant professor of psychiatry at the Semel Institute and director of the UCLA Addiction Medicine Clinic, commented in a Dec. 29 ABC Good Morning America segment about recovering addicts who turn to food as a type of “second addiction” to satisfy cravings.

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No Conclusive Evidence that Modafinil is a Brain Booster

Dr. Larissa Mooney, assistant professor of psychiatry at the Semel Institute and director of the UCLA Addiction Medicine Clinic, was quoted in a Nov. 20 NPR.org article about the use of the drug modafinil, prescribed for narcolepsy, that some people take because they think it works as a brain booster. There is no conclusive evidence for that.

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“A Conversation with Walter Ling”

The journal Addiction features a conversation with the former director of UCLA ISAP, Walter Ling.  As the article states, Dr. Ling, a neurologist and psychiatrist, “led pivotal clinical trials in the United States for all three of the only US Food and Drug Administration-approved opiate pharmacotherapies, levo-acetylmethadol (LAAM), buprenorphine and naltrexone, and is leading ongoing efforts for approval for sustained-release buprenorphine.”  This conversation is one in an occasional series recording the “views and personal experiences of people who have especially contributed to the evolution of ideas in the journal’s field of interest.”

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/add.12711/abstract

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Options for Detoxification from Opioids

Dr. Larissa Mooney, assistant clinical professor of psychiatry and member of the Integrated Substance Abuse Programs at the Semel Institute, was featured in a July 1 article on the addiction and recovery website The Fix about what options exist to help people beat an opiate or heroin drug addiction.

Mixing Energy Drinks and Alcohol and the Risk of Binge Drinking

Dr. Larissa Mooney, assistant clinical professor of psychiatry and a member of the Integrated Substance Abuse Programs at the Semel Institute, was quoted in a July 17 NBC Today Show online article about an Australian study that suggests mixing energy drinks and alcohol may be “priming” an individual to want to drink more.

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Addiction as a Brain Disorder and Treatments for Addiction

Dr. Richard Rawson, professor of psychiatry and co-director of UCLA ISAP, was featured in an April 29 Los Angeles Magazine article about people’s misunderstanding about addiction and the neurobiological roots of dependence that defines it as a brain disease.

http://www.lamag.com/citythink/wellbeing/2014/04/22/not-so-quick-fix

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Treating, Rather Than Incarcerating, Nonviolent Drug Offenders Saves Money

NIDA Notes featured an ISAP study that found that the California Substance Abuse and Crime Prevention Act (SACPA) of 2000 saved the state about $100 million in its first year.

From the article:

A California law that allows qualified drug offenders to enter substance use treatment rather than go to jail or prison saved the state close to $100 million in its first year, NIDA-supported researchers report. Dr. M. Douglas Anglin and colleagues at the University of California, Los Angeles estimated that California spent an average of $2,300 less on each of 42,000 offenders who were adjudicated under its Substance Abuse and Crime Prevention Act of 2000 (SACPA; also known as Proposition 36) than it would have spent without the Act. The savings mainly reflected reduced spending on incarceration, which outweighed the cost of extending treatment to more offenders.

“California Reaped Large Savings by Diverting Drug-Using Offenders Into Treatment,” NIDA Notes, Feb. 18, 2014

http://www.drugabuse.gov/news-events/nida-notes/2014/02/california-reaped-large-savings-by-diverting-drug-using-offenders-treatment

Full study results can be found in the article:

Anglin, M.D., Nosyk, B., Jaffe, A., Urada, D., & Evans, E. (2013).  Offender diversion into substance use disorder treatment: The economic impact of California's Proposition 36. American Journal of Public Health, 103(6), 1096-1102.


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