HIV/AIDS Projects


Longitudinal Study of Maternal HIV on their
Late Adolescent/Early Adult Children

Debra A. Murphy, Ph.D., Principal Investigator
(dmurphy@mednet.ucla.edu)
Diane Herbeck, M.A., Project Coordinator

This study was designed to extend and expand a longitudinal study (R01-MH057207-10).  “Parents And children Coping Together (PACT) was the original study, and was designed to longitudinally assess mothers living with HIV (MLHs) and their young, well children 6 to 11 years old.  Five follow-ups were conducted at 6-month intervals.  A subsequent longitudinal study, “Parents and Adolescents Coping Together” (PACT II), followed up the majority of these families when the children were transitioning to early and middle adolescence; there were 6 follow-ups.  This study  (“PACT III”) will continue to follow the MLHs and adolescents one last time, to continue to investigate outcomes as the adolescents transition to late adolescence/young adulthood.  Both quantitative and qualitative interviews will be conducted.  This would be the first cohort of children in the U.S. to be followed almost continuously as they grew up to adulthood while living with a mother with HIV/AIDS..

The Longitudinal Study of Maternal HIV on their Late Adolescent/Early Adult Children was funded by the National Institute of Mental Health, Grant R01 MH57207-11 (2008 - 2013).


HIV Prevention for Heterosexual Methamphetamine
Users in Drug Treatment

Mary-Lynn Brecht, Ph.D., Principal Investigator
(lbrecht@ucla.edu)
Elizabeth Evans, M.A., Project Director

This study is using personal interviews to collect data on HIV and injection risk behaviors, risk-related information/skills, risk-seeking, impulsivity, and resistance to coercion in a sample of 400 methamphetamine-using offenders referred to drug treatment in Kern County, California. Analyses will describe HIV risk behaviors in this sample and test relationships between these behaviors and psychosocial factors, risk-seeking, impulsivity, and resistance. Because drug treatment offers a prime opportunity for intervention aimed at prevention of HIV risk behavior, this pilot study is examining patterns of these behaviors in order to form a basis for developing interventions tailored for this population.

HIV Prevention for Heterosexual Methamphetamine Users in Drug Treatment was funded by the Universitywide AIDS Research Program, Grant ID05-LA-011 (September 2005 through August 2007).


Caregiver Intervention for Perinatally
Infected Children Unaware of Their HIV Status

Debra A. Murphy, Ph.D., Principal Investigator
(dmurphy@mednet.ucla.edu)
Judith Resell, Ph.D., Project Director

Nineteen women who had disclosed their child’s seropositive status to the child when the child was age 8 to 12 were administered in-depth, qualitative interviews. The interview questions focused on exactly how the caregiver disclosed the information to the child, the child’s immediate reactions, whether the child’s reactions changed over time, how the disclosure affected the caregiver-child relationship as well as the health care provider-child relationship, and caregiver advice to other caregivers who have not yet disclosed to their perinatally infected children that they are HIV-positive. Following the qualitative interviews, four women were selected to be re-interviewed and videotaped. A final DVD has been made of the stories of these four caregivers.

Caregiver Intervention for Perinatally Infected Children Unaware of Their HIV Status was funded by the University of Alabama, Subcontract 046a (March 2005 through February 2007).


Family-Based HIV Prevention
for Adolescent Females

Debra A. Murphy, Ph.D., Principal Investigator
(dmurphy@mednet.ucla.edu)
Judith Resell, Ph.D., Project Director

The objective of this study is to test the feasibility of implementing a mother-daughter risk reduction intervention for at-risk female adolescents, and to preliminarily explore intervention effectiveness. A sample of 68 African American or mixed-race female adolescents age 15 to 19 and their mothers or mother figure (total N = 136) will be randomized to either: a family-based risk reduction intervention or a no-treatment control group condition. Aims of this pilot study are to: develop a theoretically driven, developmentally appropriate family-based intervention to reduce risk of HIV transmission among disadvantaged, minority adolescent females who live in high HIV prevalence areas; conduct a preliminary efficacy test of the intervention to determine if trends toward significant effects for reducing unprotected sex and/or reducing substance use are found; and explore the feasibility of different recruitment methods for engaging mother (and mother figure)/daughter pairs to participate in the intervention.

Family-Based HIV Prevention for Adolescent Females was funded by the University of Alabama, Subcontract 012 (March 2006 through February 2007).


HEALTHY CHOICES: Motivational Enhancement Therapy Intervention
to Promote Health and Reduce Risk in HIV-Infected Adolescents

Debra A. Murphy, Ph.D., Principal Investigator
(dmurphy@mednet.ucla.edu)

The primary objective of this study is to determine the efficacy of a motivational enhancement intervention in reducing health risk behaviors (drug and alcohol use, sexual risk behavior, poor adherence to medications) among HIV+ youth.  Youth (N = 225) will be randomized to receive a four-session motivational intervention and referrals (Healthy Choices) or standard care plus referrals.

HEALTHY CHOICES: Motivational Enhancement Therapy Intervention to Promote Health and Reduce Risk in HIV-Infected Adolescent was funded by the University of Alabama, Subcontract 004 (July 2004 through February 2007).


Center for HIV Identification,
Prevention and Treatment Services

Mary Jane Rotheram-Borus, Ph.D., Principal Investigator (rotheram@ucla.edu)
Debra A. Murphy, Ph.D., Co-Investigator

This Center comprises an interdisciplinary group from UCLA, Drew University, RAND, and the Los Angeles County community (Department of Health and community-based agencies) with the aim to enhance understanding of HIV research and to promote early detection and effective prevention and treatment programs for HIV at the societal, community, and individual levels.

Center for HIV Identification, Prevention and Treatment Services was funded by the National Institute of Mental Health, Grant 2 P30 MH58107 (September 1997 through December 2006).


The Impact of Maternal HIV on
Early & Middle Adolescents

Debra A. Murphy, Ph.D., Principal Investigator
(dmurphy@mednet.ucla.edu)
Judith Resell, Ph.D., Project Director

This study is an extension and expansion of a longitudinal assessment study (RO1-MH 57207) of mothers with AIDS (MWAs) and their well children aged 6 to 11. The cohort of children will be transitioning to early and middle adolescence, and the MWAs and children will continue to be followed, with additional new measures to investigate behaviors associated with this developmental period. We have little information about the effects of maternal HIV on early and middle adolescents, particularly minority youth. Early adolescence is a developmental period when problem behaviors first emerge, and findings from our original study suggest that having an MWA may increase negative outcomes. The goal of this competing renewal is to continue to follow the sample every 6 months for an additional 36 months.

The Impact of Maternal HIV on Early & Middle Adolescents was funded by the National Institute of Mental Health, Grant  5 R01 MH57207 (December 2002 through November 2007).


Behavioral Therapy Development for Methamphetamine Abuse

James Peck, Psy.D., Principal Investigator
(jpeck@mednet.ucla.edu)
Steven Shoptaw, Ph.D., & Ardis Moe, M.D.
Co-Investigators

This 2-year NIDA-funded developmental study conducts Phase Ia/Phase Ib treatment development work by adapting and refining a cognitive-behavioral intervention for HIV-seropositive methamphetamine-abusing men who have sex with men and evaluating the feasibility of delivery in an HIV medical care setting.

Behavioral Therapy Development for Methamphetamine Abuse was funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse, Grant 1 R21 DA018075 (September 2004 through July 2006; extended to July 2007).


Maternal HIV: Intervention to Assist Disclosure to Children

Debra A. Murphy, Ph.D., Principal Investigator (dmurphy@mednet.ucla.edu)
Mary-Lynn Brecht, Ph.D., Co-Investigator
Diana Payne, Ph.D., Project Director

This small 3-year R01 was designed to develop and pilot test an intervention to assist mothers living with HIV (MLWH) to disclose their serostatus to their young (age 6 – 12 years old) children. Information gathered in previous two R01s will be used to develop a brief disclosure intervention to assist HIV-infected mothers of young children to appropriately disclose their serostatus to their child. Feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary efficacy of the intervention will be tested in a pilot trial. MLWHs (N = 80) will be randomly assigned to the intervention or control condition. MLWHs and children will be assessed at baseline, 3-, 6-, and 9-month follow-ups. A random subset of intervention mothers (n = 12) will be asked to participate in an in-depth qualitative interview after their last follow-up to obtain detailed information on their experiences in the study. The aims of the intervention are to: facilitate disclosure of the MLWHs’ HIV status to their children; increase their self-efficacy to responding to children’s questions regarding HIV; reduce fears regarding disclosure and stigma; improve maternal knowledge of child development and how to provide age-appropriate levels of information; improve MLWHs’ mental health indicators over time; improve children’s mental health indicators over time; and improve family functioning indicators. 

Maternal HIV: Intervention to Assist Disclosure to Children was funded by the National Institute of Mental Health, Grant 1 R01 MH077493 (January 2007 to December 2009).

Last Updated:  03/30/2009

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