Program Evaluation


Evaluation of the Community Bridges Project

Christine E. Grella, Ph.D., Principal Investigator (grella@ucla.edu)
Anne Bellows, M.S.W., Project Director

The purpose of the Community Bridges Project is to strengthen and enhance the comprehensive treatment system in Santa Monica, California, for chronically homeless persons who have co-occurring mental illness and substance use disorders. The project plans to develop a fully integrated system and treatment model for this population through collaboration among service providers that include substance abuse treatment, mental health treatment, health services, shelter and drop-in services, and transitional and permanent housing. The integrated treatment model will incorporate several evidence-based practices, including motivational interviewing and relapse prevention, with the aim of (1) increasing access to treatment, (2) increasing continuity of care and services integration, (3) improving quality of life and increasing self-determination, and (4) improving levels of functioning among participants.  In addition, the project aims to increase integration of services across the participating providers, to eliminate barriers to system entry, and to improve staff competency in treating homeless individuals with co-occurring disorders.  ISAP will conduct the project-level process and outcome evaluations and participate in the national cross-site evaluation activities.

Evaluation of Community Bridges Project was funded by the Clare Foundation (Grant 20063816), through a grant from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA; September 2006 to September 2011).


Evaluation of People in Progress’s
New Elements Treatment for Homeless Program

Richard A. Rawson, Ph.D., Principal Investigator (rrawson@mednet.ucla.edu)
Anne Bellows, M.S.W., Project Director

ISAP is conducting the process and outcome evaluations of the New Elements Treatment program, which is an intervention project provided by People in Progress. The project is funded by a 5-year grant from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Center for Substance Abuse Treatment. New Elements provides comprehensive substance abuse treatment and case management services to homeless individuals. The evaluation study is tracking the characteristics of project participants, and examining the delivery of project-specific services, adherence to the treatment models, barriers encountered in project implementation, and solutions devised to address those barriers. Focus groups with project participants and interviews with project staff are being conducted in order to monitor their respective perceptions and experiences of the project; feedback is provided from the evaluation in order to refine the project implementation.

Evaluation of People in Progress New Elements Treatment for Homeless Program was funded by People in Progress, Contract 20071053 (November 2006 to October 2011).


Evaluation of the California Access Recovery Effort (CARE)

Richard A. Rawson, Ph.D., Principal Investigator (rrawson@mednet.ucla.edu)
Donnie Watson, Ph.D., Co-Investigator
Anne Bellows, M.S.W., Project Director

California, through its Department of Alcohol and Drug Programs (ADP), is one of 14 states to receive funding from President Bush’s $100 million Access to Recovery program (ATR), which allows people in need of substance abuse treatment to make individual choices—reflecting their personal values—in their path to recovery (Web site: http://atr.samhsa.gov/). ATR is a presidential initiative that provides vouchers to clients for purchase of substance abuse clinical treatment and recovery support services. The goals of the program are to expand capacity, support client choice, and increase the array of faith-based and community-based providers for clinical treatment and recovery support services. The California Access to Recovery Effort (CARE) project focuses on youth 12 to 20 years of age residing in Sacramento and Los Angeles Counties. (N = 8,700)

The goals of the California Access Recovery Effort (CARE) evaluation are twofold;

  • The first objective is to evaluate and report on the implementation, operation, and marketing of CARE.  The marketing plan of CARE was unique in that not only were clients the targets but also potential service providers including faith-based providers who, prior to the Access to Recovery Effort, would not have been eligible for these funds.
  • The second objective is to evaluate and report the characteristics of CARE participants and treatment outcomes. This objective would use already existing data sets collected through the Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA).

Evaluation of the California Access Recovery Effort (CARE) was funded by the State of California, Alcohol and Drug Programs, Contract 07-00127 (July 2007 to December 2007).


Evaluation of the California Outcome
Measurement System (CalOMS) for Treatment

Richard A. Rawson, Ph.D., Principal Investigator (rrawson@mednet.ucla.edu)
Rachel Gonzales, Ph.D., Project Director
Julie Brummer, B.A., Project Coordinator

The California Department of Alcohol and Drug Programs (ADP) implemented a statewide data collection and management system called the California Outcome Measurement System (CalOMS) to contribute to the improvement of treatment services for substance abuse. CalOMS is the first statewide data collection and management system to comprehensively measure program outcomes using performance and outcome measures based on the federally required reporting of National Outcome Measures (NOMs), developed by the Substance Abuse and Mental Heath Services Administration (SAMHSA).  In collaboration with ADP, UCLA Integrated Substance Abuse Programs (ISAP) is conducting the evaluation study of CalOMS. The objectives of the evaluation study are to:

  • Use CALOMS data to improve knowledge of alcohol and other drug (AOD) treatment services in California.
  • Enhance the capability of county administrators to use CalOMS data to improve treatment services.
  • Evaluate the quality and validity of CalOMS data.
  • Develop recommendations for improvement of the CalOMS system.

Addressing these objectives will help ADP improve the quality and performance of AOD treatment services in California and to maximize the usability of CalOMS data to enhance treatment policies and practices in California.

Evaluation of the CalOMS Data was funded by the State of California, Alcohol and Drug Programs, Contract 06-00216 (June 2007 to December 2008).


Evaluation of the Effective
Adolescent Treatment (EAT) Project

Christine E. Grella, Ph.D., Principal Investigator (grella@ucla.edu)
Jeffrey Annon, M.A., Project Director

ISAP is conducting the site-level evaluation of the Effective Adolescent Treatment (EAT) Project at Tarzana Treatment Centers (TTC). The EAT projects are sponsored by the U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Center for Substance Abuse Treatment. TTC is providing an evidence-based intervention, the Motivational Enhancement Therapy and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Adolescents – 5 sessions (MET/CBT 5), to adolescents who are in their outpatient substance abuse treatment program for youth. The goals of the MET/CBT 5 intervention are to increase motivation for and engagement in substance abuse treatment, and to provide behavioral skills training for relapse prevention and drug-use resistance. ISAP provides evaluation and data management services to the EAT project through a contract with its Data Management Center, monitors project implementation, and provides technical assistance for tracking and locating participants for follow-up.

Evaluation of the Effective Adolescent Treatment (EAT) Project was funded by Tarzana Treatment Center, Subcontract HR-096 (October 2004 through September 2007).


Evaluation of the Homeless Interventions
 Treatment Options Project (HI-TOP)

Christine E. Grella, Ph.D., Principal Investigator
(grella@ucla.edu)
Suzanne Spear, M.A., Project Director

ISAP is conducting the process and outcome evaluations of the Homeless Interventions Treatment Options Project (HI-TOP), which is an intervention project provided by Special Service for Groups, Inc. The project is funded by a 5-year grant from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Center for Substance Abuse Treatment. HI-TOP provides comprehensive substance abuse treatment and case management services to homeless individuals who have co-occurring substance abuse and mental health disorders. Treatment approaches include cognitive behavioral and motivational enhancement therapies within the context of residential treatment and aftercare services provided to participants. The evaluation study is tracking the characteristics of project participants, and examining the delivery of project-specific services, adherence to the treatment models, barriers encountered in project implementation, and solutions devised to address those barriers. Focus groups with project participants and interviews with project staff are being conducted in order to monitor their respective perceptions and experiences of the project; feedback is provided from the evaluation in order to refine the project implementation. 

Evaluation of Homeless Interventions Treatment Options Project was funded by Special Service for Groups, Inc., Subcontract 243 (April 2005 through September 2009).


Evaluation of Horizon's Integrated AODA Treatment/HIV
Services for Justice Involved Women

Nena Messina, Ph.D., Principal Investigator (nmessina@ucla.edu)
Project Director and degree: Kira Jeter, M.P.H.

 The purpose of this SAMHSA funded project is to expand Horizons’ Community Connections Program (CCP) to increase access to outpatient AODA treatment and HIV services for a minimum of 600 justice involved women who are less likely to access treatment through formal systems. The project goal is to increase access for justice involved women to access gender-specific, integrated outpatient AODA treatment and HIV prevention services. Objectives are to: (1) increase the number of women who participate in integrated outpatient AODA/HIV services from 25 women to 125 women per year; (2) enhance the CCP with research-based HIV/AODA curricula that will engage hard to reach women, their children and their partners; and (3) increase the number of women and partners who receive rapid HIV testing from 90 to 200 per year.

  • ISAP will conduct the evaluation which will: (1) include process and outcome components to monitor the implementation of the planned intervention and (2) measure observed changes in participants from before to after their participation in the project in the following domains of functioning: (a) alcohol and drug use; (b) parenting behaviors and family functioning; (c) quality of life and social functioning; (d) criminal behavior and legal status; (e) mental health and physical health status; (f) HIV/AIDS risk reduction behaviors; and (g) treatment and services received.

ISAP will determine the degree the project was able to increase access for justice involved women to access gender-specific, integrated outpatient AODA treatment and HIV prevention services.

Evaluation of Horizon's, Inc. Integrated AODA Treatment/HIV Services for Justice Involved Women was fundedby the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Grant TI-07-004 to HORIZON’S, Inc. (October 2007 to September 2012).


Evaluation of the Liberating our Families from Drugs and Incarceration Program

Christine E. Grella, Principal Investigator (grella@ucla.edu)

ISAP is conducting the evaluation of the SAMHSA-funded program “Liberating our Families from Drugs and Incarceration (LOFFDI),” which is part of the Pregnant and Parenting Women’s Treatment Initiative at the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment.  The LOFFDI program is provided at the Walden House program in El Monte, CA, and it aims to assist women parolees as they reintegrate into the community and reunify with children and other family members.  The program’s objectives are to improve the mental and physical health status and employability of participants, as well as the overall psychosocial functioning of participants and their families, and thereby reduce the risk of relapse to substance abuse and criminal behavior. The program provides intensive case management services within the context of residential substance abuse treatment, which includes family counseling, parenting skills training, vocational services, mental health services, and trauma-related services. The site-specific evaluation was designed to collect data on the relevant background characteristics of this sample and their level of functioning in the outcome domains that are targeted by the intervention. In addition, the evaluation will be conducting site visit observations of project implementation and focus groups with project participants. Follow-up interviews with participants will assess their satisfaction with the services received in LOFFDI, in addition to changes in the relevant outcome domains (i.e., substance use, physical and mental health status, employment status, family functioning, criminal behavior, pregnancy and child-related outcomes). 

Evaluation of the Liberating our Families from Drugs and Incarceration Program was funded by Walden House, Inc., Contract20064370 (October 2006 to September 2009).


Los Angeles County Evaluation System (LACES):
An Outcomes Reporting Program

Richard A. Rawson, Ph.D., Principal Investigator (rrawson@mednet.ucla.edu)
M. Douglas Anglin, Ph.D., Co-Investigator
Desirée Crèvecoeur, M.A., Project Director

The Los Angeles County Evaluation System (LACES) is designed to assess the overall effectiveness of the county’s alcohol and drug treatment/recovery system and measure the effectiveness of specific service modalities and service components. To accomplish this, LACES augmented the intake and discharge questions used by the county’s alcohol and drug treatment/recovery system. The revised admission and discharge questions provide information that is used to evaluate the treatment system at the county level, but they also serve to satisfy the additional requirements outlined by the state under the California Outcomes Measurement System (CalOMS) and the federal government as defined by the National Outcomes Measurement System (NOMS). The changes to the admission and discharge questions ensure that Los Angeles County is at the forefront of the movement to bring more accountability to the alcohol and other drug treatment system. In addition, the information gained from the revised admission and discharge questions allow LACES to assess individual programs through the use of site reports that provide outcome and performance information based on the same areas under examination by the state and federal governments. Future tasks for LACES include the assessment of participants’ satisfaction with treatment and the further refinement of the site reports to include benchmarks to measure and improve program performance. (Additional information is available at www.laces-ucla.org.)

Los Angeles County Evaluation System (LACES): An Outcomes Reporting Program was funded by the Los Angeles County Alcohol and Drug Program Administration, Contract H700244 (March 2004 through June 2010).


Swiftness and Certainty in Enforcing Probation Conditions:
Hawaii’s H.O.P.E. Program

Angela Hawken, Ph.D., Principal Investigator (ahawken@ucla.edu)
Mark Kleiman, Ph.D., Co-Investigator
Elizabeth Evans, M.A., Project Director

While most experts agree that the probation system should be reformed, policy makers will need some real world evidence of the effectiveness of different approaches to probation before they act. Hawaii offers an opportunity to test whether a more strategic approach to probation and parole can lead to better outcomes. The goal of this project is to evaluate Hawaii’s Opportunity Probation with Enforcement (HOPE) program. HOPE involves regular random drug testing with swift and certain but modest sanctions for every dirty UA or probation violation. The design and implementation of HOPE focuses on personal responsibility and accountability and includes a timely mechanism (sanctions are imposed immediately) and modest sanctions (typically two days in jail, but terms increase for continued non-compliance) for dealing with probation violations. If HOPE is as successful at scale as it was in the original pilot–with reductions of more than 80% in rates of noncompliance and large reductions in recidivism and therefore public-sector costs–it represents a potential revolution in corrections and in drug policy. This project entails an outcome evaluation, process evaluation, and cost analysis of the HOPE project as implemented in the Special Probation Unit for high-risk drug-involved probationers (primarily methamphetamine users) in Honolulu. 

Swiftness and Certainty in Enforcing Probation Conditions: Hawaii’s H.O.P.E. Program was funded by the National Institute of Justice, Grant 2007-IJ-CX-0033 (July 2007 to June 2008).

Last Updated: 03/05/2008

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