Research to Practice Projects


Feasibility Study of Dentofacial
Injury in Adolescents

Douglas Longshore, Ph.D. (deceased Dec. 30, 2005), Debra A. Murphy, Ph.D. (as of March 8, 2006),
Principal Investigators (dmurphy@mednet.ucla.edu)
Vivek Shetty, D.D.S., Co-Investigator
Judith Resell, Ph.D., Project Director

The primary objectives for this project are: (1) to test protocols for recruitment and informed consent among high risk minority adolescents receiving treatment for dentofacial injury and their adult caregivers; (2) to assess adolescents’ and caregivers’ willingness to participate in prospective observational and intervention research on dentofacial injury; (3) to assess psychometric properties and cultural appropriateness of measures of risk and protective factors; and (4) to identify possible risk and protective factors relevant to dentofacial injury among high-risk minority adolescents.

Feasibility Study of Dentofacial Injury in Adolescents was funded by the National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research, Grant 5 R21 DE016490 (September 2004 through June 2007).

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Reducing the Disproportionate
Burden of Orofacial Injury

Vivek Shetty, D.D.S., Principal Investigator
(vshetty@ucla.edu)
Douglas Longshore, Ph.D. (deceased Dec. 30, 2005), Debra A. Murphy, Ph.D. (as of March 8, 2006), Co-Investigators (dmurphy@mednet.ucla.edu)
Judith Resell, Ph.D., Project Director

This is a two-arm randomized controlled study to test the effectiveness of an innovative personalized motivational intervention aimed at reducing substance use, improving treatment outcomes, and decreasing recurrent injury among patients with orofacial injuries. The intervention will be tailored to the service needs of each patient and will employ motivational intervention techniques to effect behavioral change.  Approximately 720 orofacial injury patients evidencing substance use and other risky behaviors will be assigned to either a Personalized Motivational Intervention Treatment group or a Health Information “attention control” group. We hypothesize that by integrating into trauma care a personalized assessment of alcohol/drug, psychological, and other service needs, plus active service referrals in a motivational intervention approach, we will significantly reduce the adverse consequences of orofacial injury, improve treatment outcomes, and decrease rates of re-injury, thus off-setting intervention costs.

Reducing the Disproportionate Burden of Orofacial Injury was funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse to the UCLA Department of Dentistry, Grant 5 R01 DA16850, with collaboration by UCLA ISAP (September 2003 through June 2008).

Last Updated: 03/30/2009

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2016 ISAP Publications
2015 ISAP Publications