Substance Abuse Policy Projects


Assessing Treatment Disparities
Following Drug Policy Reforms

M. Douglas Anglin, Ph.D., Principal Investigator
(doug_anglin@hotmail.com)
Angela Hawken, Ph.D., Co-Investigator

With 61% of voters approving Proposition 36 in 2000, California was in the vanguard of states adopting drug-treatment programs as an alternative to incarceration or probation without treatment for certain types of drug offenders. As enacted in 2001, the Substance Abuse and Crime Prevention Act of 2000 (SACPA) established sentencing guidelines for adults convicted of nonviolent drug offenses. In evaluating SACPA, we found low rates of placement into residential care for high-severity SACPA clients, particularly for young Hispanic men, and woefully inadequate use of narcotic-replacement therapy, particularly for young African-American men. The type of treatment that high-severity SACPA clients receive does matter, both for their improved treatment outcomes and for the broader public, through the impact on their criminal-justice outcomes. We make several suggestions for policy reforms related to the treatment of SACPA offenders, including:

  • Expanded use of residential treatment for high-severity SACPA clients, particularly among those reporting methamphetamine as their primary drug. Follow-up outcomes suggest the provision of such treatment will be cost effective.
  • Expanded use of narcotic-replacement therapy for SACPA clients reporting opiates as their primary drug. Follow-up outcomes suggest the provision of such treatment will be cost effective.

Such undertreatment of SACPA clients, in particular the disparity in the provision of residential treatment to minority offenders and the limited use of NRT, warrants further investigation, asit may be amenable to policy change.

Assessing Treatment Disparities Following Drug Policy Reforms was funded by the California Policy Research Center (July 2005 to October 2006).

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Drug Abuse Treatment:
Process, Outcomes, & Social Policy

M. Douglas Anglin, Ph.D., Principal Investigator
(doug_anglin@hotmail.com)

The NIDA Senior Scientist Award (K05) provides support for researchers who have consistently and productively advanced the empirical understanding of substance abuse and its amelioration. The award enables scientists to develop their research capabilities unencumbered by the constraint of salary maintenance solely through research funding sources. In 1994, after providing 5 years of support through Research Scientist Development Awards and Independent Scientist Awards, NIDA granted Dr. Anglin the K05 award for a 5-year span to: (1) provide direction for ISAP; (2) conduct research that advances the scientific understanding of substance abuse and treatment; (3) promote integration of research findings into policymaking, serving to bridge the gap between research and practice, and to improve practice standards for the delivery of publicly funded treatment for substance abuse; and (4) promote the education and training of junior investigators and postdoctoral fellows in substance abuse research. This award was competitively renewed for an additional 7 years in 1999. As an Associate Director of ISAP, Dr. Anglin continues to guide the organization’s multidisciplinary approach to studying the patterns and consequences of substance abuse, which has yielded major contributions to the field in such areas as research methods, treatment development, treatment evaluation, and the forming of policy related to substance abuse and its treatment.

Drug Abuse Treatment: Process, Outcomes, & Social Policy was funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse, Grant 5 K05 DA00499 (September 2000 to August 2007).

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Addiction Health Services
Research Conference 2005

Douglas Longshore, Ph.D. (deceased Dec.31, 2005), and Christine E. Grella, Ph.D. (grella@ucla.edu),
Principal Investigators
Cheryl Teruya, Ph.D., & Darren Urada, Ph.D.,
Project Directors

The grant provided support for the annual Addiction Health Services Research Conference, which was co-hosted by UCLA ISAP and the RAND Corporation. The conference was held in October 2005 at the RAND facilities in Santa Monica. Approximately 150 individuals attended, included representatives from the conference sponsors, National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF). Plenary presentations included: (1) Principles of Community-Based Participatory Research (P. Koegel, RAND); (2) NIH Roadmap:  Links from Basic to Services Research (R. Builder, UCLA); (3) Clinical Research in Community Settings (K. Kahn, UCLA and RAND); (4) Clinical Health Services Research: Quality Assurance and Data Monitoring (R. Chandler, NIDA); and (5) Future Directions in Health Services Research (W. Compton, NIDA; V. Capoccia, RWJF; M. Willenbring, NIAAA). The conference also included a presentation by the Entertainment Industries Council on From the Lab to the Lens; break-out sessions, poster sessions, and opportunities for junior investigators to meet with NIH staff.  A special issue based on the conference proceedings is being prepared for publication. (Additional information is available at www.uclaisap.org/ahsr/presentations.html.)

The Addiction Health Services Research Conference 2005 was funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Grant 55371 (September 2005 through September 2006) to Douglas Longshore/Christine Grella, and the National Institute on Drug Abuse, Contract 263-MH-517174 (September 2005 through December 2005) to Douglas Longshore/Christine Grella.

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Disaster Planning in the Context of Methadone Treatment Regulation

Deborah Podus, Ph.D., Principal Investigator (dpodus@ucla.edu)
M. Douglas Anglin, Ph.D., Co-Investigator

This study is part of a larger study of emergency responses to disruptions in the delivery of methadone maintenance treatment in the aftermath of natural disasters, primarily hurricanes, in five Gulf Coast states. The primary focus of this project is on how federal and state methadone regulatory systems support or impede the quality of addiction treatment in the event of a natural disaster. Research findings will be used be used to improve contingency planning and mitigation strategies for future disasters. (See also: “Emergency Management for Disruptions in Methadone Treatment.”)

Disaster Planning in the Context of Methadone Treatment Regulation was funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Substance Abuse Policy Research Program, Grant 61374 (May 2007 to April 2008).

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Emergency Management for Disruptions in Methadone Treatment

Deborah Podus, Ph.D., Principal Investigator (dpodus@ucla.edu)
M. Douglas Anglin, Ph.D., Co-Investigator

This project examines emergency responses to disruptions in the delivery of methadone maintenance treatment in the aftermath of natural disasters. The primary focus is on natural disasters due to hurricanes in five Gulf Coast states. The project will employ multiple research methods to examine the impacts of disasters at all levels of the treatment system: local, state, and federal. The study will examine the types of treatment disruptions that treatment programs have experienced; assess how effectively different levels of the treatment have responded to these disruptions; explore the longer term impacts of a disaster on the treatment system; and examine the status of disaster mitigation efforts at the state-level in all states that have methadone treatment facilities. Findings from the study will be used to improve contingency planning and mitigation strategies for future disasters. (See also:  “Disaster Planning in the Context of Methadone Treatment Regulation.”)

Emergency Management for Disruptions in Methadone Treatment was funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse, Grant 1 R21 DA023045 (May 2007 to April 2009).

Last Updated: 03/30/2009

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2016 ISAP Publications
2015 ISAP Publications