Substance Use Disorders Policy Projects


Disaster Planning in the Context of Methadone Treatment Regulation

Deborah Podus, Ph.D., Principal Investigator (dpodus@ucla.edu)
M. Douglas Anglin, Ph.D., Co-Investigator

This study was part of a larger study of emergency responses to disruptions in the delivery of methadone maintenance treatment in the aftermath of natural disasters, primarily hurricanes, in five Gulf Coast states. The primary focus of this project was on how federal and state methadone regulatory systems support or impede the quality of addiction treatment in the event of a natural disaster. Research findings (see references below) will be used  to improve contingency planning and mitigation strategies for future disasters.

  • Maxwell, J.C., Podus, D., & Walsh, D., (2009). Lessons learned from the deadly sisters: Substance abuse treatment disruption and consequences from Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. Substance Use & Misuse 44(12):1681-1694.
  • Podus, D., Maxwell, J.C., & Anglin, M.D., (2011). Public health emergencies and substance abuse in G.B. Kapur and J.P. Smith (eds.), Emergency Public Health: Preparedness and Response. Sudbury, MA: Jones and Bartlett Publishers, pp. 531-543.

(See also: “Emergency Management for Disruptions in Methadone Treatment.”)

Disaster Planning in the Context of Methadone Treatment Regulation was funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Substance Abuse Policy Research Program, Grant 61374 (May 2007 to April 2010).

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Emergency Management for Disruptions in Methadone Treatment

Deborah Podus, Ph.D., Principal Investigator (dpodus@ucla.edu)
M. Douglas Anglin, Ph.D., Co-Investigator

This project examined emergency responses to disruptions in the delivery of methadone maintenance treatment in the aftermath of natural disasters. The primary focus was on natural disasters due to hurricanes in five Gulf Coast states. The project employed multiple research methods to examine the impacts of disasters at all levels of the treatment system: local, state, and federal. The study examined the types of treatment disruptions that treatment programs have experienced; assessed how effectively different levels of the treatment system have responded to these disruptions; explored the longer-term impacts of a disaster on the treatment system; and examined the status of disaster mitigation efforts at the state-level in all states that have methadone treatment facilities. Findings from the study will be used to improve contingency planning and mitigation strategies for future disasters. (See also:  “Disaster Planning in the Context of Methadone Treatment Regulation.”)

Emergency Management for Disruptions in Methadone Treatment was funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse, Grant 1 R21 DA023045 (May 2007 to April 2009).

Last Updated: 08/30/2011

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2016 ISAP Publications
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