International Projects (2010-2012)


Drug Demand Reduction Initiative for Iraq

Richard A. Rawson, Ph.D., Principal Investigator (rrawson@mednet.ucla.edu)

SAMHSA, in collaboration with the U.S. State Department’s Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs, awarded ISAP this grant to support the Iraqi Ministry of Health in establishing a sustainable and functional Center of Excellence on Substance Abuse Services at Baghdad’s Medical City Complex. This project strengthened the substance use disorder treatment and prevention capacity in Iraq. Funds were used by ISAP to develop training programs and technical assistance in screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT), as well as medication strategies and organizational and supervisory responsibilities. Along with ISAP, the project’s subcontracted organizations, Cairo University, SKOUN Lebanese Addictions Center, and Inova Fairfax Hospital in Virginia, trained a core group of Iraqi medical professionals to disseminate clinical and research expertise into substance use disorder service systems throughout Iraq. In addition, a Community Epidemiology Workgroup was established to monitor drug trends in Iraq.

Drug Demand Reduction Initiative for Iraq was funded by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, grant 1 U79 T1023450, from August 2011 to November 2012.

Improving Methadone Maintenance Treatment
Compliance and Outcomes in China

Yih-Ing Hser, Ph.D., Principal Investigator (yhser@ucla.edu)
Elizabeth Evans, M.A., Project Director

This study was a collaboration between the UCLA Integrated Substance Abuse Programs (ISAP), the Shanghai Mental Health Center (Co-PI: Min Zhao, M.D., Ph.D), and the Yunnan Institute for Drug Abuse (Co-PI: Jianhua Li, Ph.D.). Motivational incentives (MI; a form of contingency management) have been well researched and proven efficacious by many studies conducted in Western countries. This study evaluated the efficacy of using an MI intervention to reduce treatment dropout and opiate use in methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) in China. The study had two phases. The goal of the developmental phase was to adapt study protocols and assessment questionnaires to the local community via input from focus group participants and community advisory board members. The second phase was a pilot-test of the MI intervention in several MMT clinics located in Shanghai and Kunming and involving 320 MMT patients. For more information, visit http://uclaisap.org/InternationalProjects/html/china/index.html.

Relevant publications are:

Hser, Y.I., Li, J., Jiang, H., Zhang, R., Du, J., Zhang, C., Zhang, B., Evans, E., Wu, F., Chang, Y.J., Peng, C., Huang, D., Stitzer, M.L., Roll, J., & Zhao, M. (2011). Effects of a randomized contingency management intervention on opiate abstinence and retention in methadone maintenance treatment in China. Addiction, 106(10): 1801-1809.

Hser, Y., Du, J., Li, J., Zhao, M., Chang, Y.J., Peng, C.Y., & Evans, E. (in press).  Hepatitis C among methadone maintenance treatment patients in Shanghai and Kunming, China. Journal of Public Health.

Improving Methadone Maintenance Treatment Compliance and Outcomes in China was funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse, grant 1 R21 DA025252, from August 2008 to July 2010.

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It Came from the North:
Estimating the Production of
Synthetic Drugs in Quebec, Canada

David Farabee, Ph.D., Principal Investigator (dfarabee@ucla.edu)
Carlo Morselli, Ph.D. (University of Montreal) &
Sheldon Zhang, Ph.D. (San Diego State University), Co-Investigators

The primary focus of this study is to estimate the size of synthetic drug production (methamphetamine in particular) in Quebec, Canada, assess its export potential, and explore implications for counter-narcotics policies.  Official reports from both countries and the United Nations suggest that Canada is becoming a major global supplier of synthetic drugs. But little empirical research has been conducted to verify these claims or to estimate the size of the drug trade. Estimating the production and trafficking of any illicit drugs is a daunting endeavor because conventional sampling or statistical procedures are inadequate. In this study, we apply the capture-recapture sampling and multiple data sources to gauge this “hidden market” and its impact on the U.S. drug market. 

It Came from the North: Estimating the Production of Synthetic Drugs in Quebec, Canada, was funded by the National Institute of Justice, grant 2010-IJ-CX-0020, from January 2011 to December 2013.

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Reducing HIV/AIDS and Drug Abuse:
Linking Compulsory Rehabilitation to Methadone Maintenance

Yih-Ing Hser, Ph.D., Principal Investigator
Elizabeth Evans, M.A., Project Director

This project was a collaboration between the UCLA Integrated Substance Abuse Programs (ISAP) and the Shanghai Mental Health Center (Co-PI: Min Zhao, M.D., Ph.D) to develop and pilot-test a Recovery Management Intervention (RMI) program for heroin addicts released from compulsory rehabilitation in China. The study explored the effectiveness of the intervention in improving transition to the community and access to methadone maintenance treatment. For more information, visit http://uclaisap.org/InternationalProjects/html/china/index.html.

Reducing HIV/AIDS and Drug Abuse: Linking Compulsory Rehabilitation to Methadone Maintenance was funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse, grant 1 R21 DA025385, from September 2008 to August 2010. The project had a no-cost extension through 2011.

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Vietnam HIV-Addiction Technology Transfer Center: VHATTC

Richard A. Rawson, Ph.D., Principal Investigator (rrawson@mednet.ucla.edu)
Valerie Pearce Antonini, M.P.H., Project Director

Vietnam is experiencing an HIV epidemic due, in large part, to injection drug use.  Ongoing training and workforce development in the areas of substance use disorders (SUDs) and HIV is needed.  An organizational resource for workforce development used in the United States for over 15 years, the Addiction Technology Transfer Center [ATTC]), is being translated and applied in Vietnam (Vietnam HIV-ATTC). The VH-ATTC was established in September 2011 at Hanoi Medical University (HMU) as a vehicle to disseminate evidence-based SUD and HIV treatment and prevention practices. The program will conduct training programs for counselors and medical professionals; develop partnerships between HMU, government and NGO leaders, policymakers, and health professionals; and promote the principles of harm reduction and recovery-oriented systems of care. The VH-ATTC will draw upon the expertise of the U.S. ATTC as well as the tremendous amount of training and advocacy work conducted by HMU, Family Health International (FHI), the World Health Organization (WHO), and the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC). In its first year of implementation, the VH-ATTC has established an accepted identity as a key training and technical assistance resource among the organizations delivering SUD and HIV services and governmental agencies in Vietnam.  For more information, visit http://www.uclaisap.org/vhattc/index.html or http://www.uclaisap.org/InternationalProjects/html/vietnam/index.html

Vietnam HIV-Addiction Technology Transfer Center: VHATTC was funded by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, grant 1 UD1 TI023603, from September 2011 to August 2014.

Last Updated: 12/04/2012

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