Training (2012-2014)


2014-2015 NIDA INVEST
Research Fellowship for Dr. Haifeng Jiang

Walter Ling, M.D., Principal Investigator
(lwalter@ucla.edu)

This grant was provided by the National Institute on Drug Abuse’s Clinical Trials Network (CTN) to provide training in drug abuse and to foster collaboration between the grantee with established investigators at the sponsoring site. Dr. Jiang’s goals were to attain expertise in clinical trials research and learn sophisticated research methodologies. His research plan had three components.  First, to conduct analysis of a NIDA-funded clinical research project examining peak and trough blood levels between weeks 4 and 12, post intake of 100 methadone maintained-individuals in China to investigate the possible relationships between metabolic phenomena and clinical outcomes among patients enrolled in methadone maintenance.  Additionally, throughout the fellowship period at the UCLA Integrated Substance Abuse Programs (ISAP), he participated with ISAP Director Dr. Ling and other physicians and clinical personnel in the conduct of clinical trials of addiction treatments, and attended pertinent seminars, presentations, and formal courses. Lastly, Dr. Jiang considered how the knowledge he gained at UCLA ISAP could be applied upon his return to China, in the hope of improving the understanding and implementation of opioid agonist pharmacotherapy and thereby improving rates of retention and successful outcomes of treatment for opioid use disorders in China. 

2014-2015 NIDA INVEST Research Fellowship for Dr. Haifeng Jiang was funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse, grant 20101668, from July 2014 to June 2015.


California Addiction Training and
Education Series (CATES)

Thomas E. Freese, Ph.D., Principal Investigator
(tfreese@mednet.ucla.edu)
Beth Rutkowski, M.P.H., Project Director

CATES is a series of one-day trainings (launched in March 2004) designed to provide in-depth information to individuals working with substance-using populations. The information provided is based on sound science but presented in such a way that it is directly useful when working with these clients. CATES trainings cover one or two topics per year. Each topic is presented in at least three locations across California. The target audience for CATES is substance use disorders and mental health treatment providers, administrators, and other professionals (e.g., researchers, psychologists, educators, law enforcement personnel, nurses, and physicians) interested in the latest information on the impact of substance use disorders and effective interventions and treatments. An expanded version of CATES, which, depending on the topic, includes opportunities for 3 to 6 months of follow-up, coaching conference calls and, Webinars, was initiated in the spring of 2007. The purpose of this follow-up is to provide CATES training participants with opportunities for ongoing learning, technical assistance, and skill development. More than 40 CATES training sessions have been conducted since the series’ inception, and have involved several thousand California-based treatment practitioners. Topics covered to date in the CATES series include methamphetamine treatment; motivational interviewing and contingency management; improving client engagement and retention in treatment; PTSD and substance abuse, with a focus on returning military members, veterans, and their families; addiction treatment under health reform; and screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT). (Additional information is available at www.psattc.org.)

CATES was funded in part by the State of California, Department of Health Care Services, contract 10-00130, from October 2010 through September 2015.


Center for Advancing Longitudinal
Drug Abuse Research (CALDAR)

Yih-Ing Hser, Ph.D., Principal Investigator
(yhser@ucla.edu)
Mary-Lynn Brecht, Ph.D., Christine E. Grella, Ph.D., Debra A. Murphy, Ph.D.,
Michael Prendergast, Ph.D., & Constance Weisner, Dr.P.H., M.S.W., Co-Investigators
Cheryl Teruya, Ph.D., Project Director

The overarching theme of the UCLA Center for Advancing Longitudinal Drug Abuse Research (CALDAR), a multidisciplinary research unit, is the development and application of rigorous scientific approaches for advancing longitudinal research on substance abuse and its interplay with HIV infection, substance abuse treatment, and other service systems. The aims of CALDAR are to: (1) increase knowledge of longitudinal patterns of drug addiction and their interplay with HIV infection, drug treatment, and other service systems (e.g., mental health, criminal justice, welfare, medical care); (2) enhance the quality and efficiency of research conducted by Center-supported projects by providing centralized support to serve common project functions; (3) provide opportunities for scientific collaboration and cross-project analyses, stimulating conceptual development and integration, and advancing improved research methodologies and statistical approaches; and (4) enhance the relevance and application of longitudinal research on drug use by facilitating dissemination of integrated project findings to a variety of communities. Infrastructure and activities of the Center are designed to provide intensive training for enhancing the conceptualization of and methodological approaches to conducting longitudinal research, and to disseminate empirical findings on life-course drug-use trajectories and their interplay with social and service systems. Special emphasis is placed on minority and/or underserved populations, who often carry a disproportionate burden of the social problems related to substance abuse and HIV/AIDS. The Center hosts the biennial CALDAR Summer Institute on Longitudinal Research Findings and Methods (see next project). Additional information is available at www.CALDAR.org.

The Center for Advancing Longitudinal Drug Abuse Research was funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse, Grant 5 P30 DA016383, from September 2005 through August 2015.


CALDAR Institute on Longitudinal Research Findings and Methods

Yih-Ing Hser, Ph.D., Principal Investigator
(yhser@ucla.edu)
Faculty: Mary-Lynn Brecht, Ph.D., David Farabee, Ph.D., Thomas Freese, Ph.D.,
Christine E. Grella, Ph.D., Walter Ling, M.D., Debra A. Murphy, Ph.D.,
Michael Prendergast, Ph.D., Richard A. Rawson, Ph.D.
Elizabeth Evans and Marya Schulte, Ph.D., Project Directors

This project provides funding over a period of five years for three 3-day Institutes on longitudinal research findings and methods, thereby continuing the biennial Institute series that was established in 2006. Each Institute involves a full-day conference and subsequent 2-day intensive training program. The goal of the Institute is to disseminate current findings and effective methods in longitudinal drug addiction research and related topics. The first day of each event comprises thematic panels (e.g., interdisciplinary research, HIV and drug abuse, life course drug use perspective and services integration, chronic care models and interventions, adolescents and early interventions) of renowned speakers in plenary sessions within a conference format. The format of the second and third days consists of intensive, hands-on workshops on statistical methods and research methodology. Career development workshops (e.g., on funding mechanisms, grant writing) are also provided. The Institutes accomplish three main objectives: (1) Disseminate current theory, state-of-the-art methods, and findings in longitudinal research from a variety of disciplines on drug abuse and related themes to Institute audiences of approximately 150 attendees, including junior/senior researchers, clinicians/providers, and other stakeholders; (2) Provide investigators and advanced students with unique opportunities to gain knowledge pertaining to methodological tools necessary for the conceptualization and analysis of longitudinal research data; and (3) Provide an environment for learning and sharing scientific knowledge and research experience as well as a forum for collaboration and the synergism of ideas that lead to innovative longitudinal research. The materials that are disseminated originate from the NIDA-funded Center for Advancing Longitudinal Drug Abuse Research and from highly regarded researchers from around the world. Additional information is available at http://www.caldar.org/html2/summer-institute.html.

The CALDAR Institute on Longitudinal Research Findings and Methods was funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse, Grant R13 DA024494 from January 2008 through December 2012 and Grant R13 DA035084 from January 2014 through December 2019.


Cognitive Neuroscience of Decision Making
in Recovery from Alcoholism

Mitchell Karno, Ph.D., Principal Investigator
(karno@ucla.edu)

This career development award will promote Dr. Karno’s progression into transdisciplinary research on recovery from alcoholism.  Building on Dr. Karno’s background in studying the mechanisms of action of behavioral treatments, the goal of this application is for Dr. Karno to gain expertise in cognitive neuroscience as it relates to efforts to change one’s alcohol use. The objectives of the project are for Dr. Karno to acquire sufficient knowledge of decision theory, neuroscience, and neuroimaging to permit him to conduct independent research that examines linkages between thought processes and brain activity with changes in alcohol use among problem drinkers.

Cognitive Neuroscience of Decision Making in Recovery from Alcoholism was funded by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, grant 1 K02 AA018374, from August 2011 to July 2016.


ISAP-CDCR Interagency Agreement (CDCR Staff Development Training)

Thomas Freese, Ph.D., Principal Investigator (tfreese@mednet.ucla.edu)
Beth A. Rutkowski, MPH, Project Director (brutkowski@mednet.ucla.edu)

The UCLA Integrated Substance Abuse Programs (ISAP) Training Department will provide substance use disorder (SUD) treatment-related training and technical assistance to the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR), Division of Rehabilitation Programs, Office of Offender Services, through an annual Interagency Agreement (IA). The IA will support a number of CDCR’s priorities and efforts.  The IA includes the development and delivery of five daylong training workshops on a variety of topics related to substance use disorders, its consequences, and its treatment, with salient impacts on practice and policy.  The trainings commenced on June 30, 2014, on the topic of substance use disorder treatment 101.  Four additional trainings will be held between October 2014 and June 2015.

 ISAP-CDCR Interagency Agreement (CDCR Staff Development Training) was funded by the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, contract 5600004606, from June 2014 to June 2015.


ISAP Training Program in Addiction Health Services Research

Christine Grella, Ph.D., Principal Investigator (cgrella@mednet.ucla.edu)
Kira Jeter, M.P.H., Training Coordinator

The ISAP Training Program in Addiction Health Services Research provides comprehensive training to two predoctoral and three postdoctoral trainees annually in the following areas:  (a) drug use epidemiology; (b) treatment need, access, and utilization; (c) clinical trials research, intervention development, and implementation research; (d) treatment outcomes among the general population and special populations, including women, racial/ethnic groups, impoverished/homeless individuals, offenders, youth and older adults, and individuals with or affected by HIV/AIDS; (e) research methodologies for conducting health services oriented research in diverse organizational and service delivery settings; (f) statistical analyses, including multi-level and longitudinal modeling of complex data and analyses of health-related services utilization data; (g) emergent policy issues and research opportunities relevant to the delivery of addiction health services within the context of the changing health services delivery system; and (h) responsible conduct of research.  Trainees also receive comprehensive training in professional development skills in the areas of grant preparation, publishing, scientific presentations, and job search in order to equip them to undertake successful careers as independent investigators. Trainees participate in a core curriculum seminar and work with a team of mentors to develop an individualized plan of training based on their research interests and goals. The training program is guided by an executive committee (Grella, Farabee, Murphy, and Hser) and undergoes annual evaluation in collaboration with other T32 training programs in addiction research.

ISAP Training Program in Addiction Health Services Research was funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse, grant 2 T32 DA07272, from September 1991 through June 2018.


Los Angeles County,
Department of Mental Health
Co-Occurring Disorder Training Program

Thomas Freese, Ph.D., Principal Investigator
(tfreese@mednet.ucla.edu)
Sherry Larkins, Ph.D., Co-Investigator & Project Director (larkins@ucla.edu)

This 3-year training and technical assistance (TA) project focused on skill and knowledge development of the Los Angeles County Department of Mental Health workforce to ensure providers are delivering more integrated and  capable care for those with co-occurring disorders. To infuse co-occurring disorders (COD) knowledge and skills into the LA County mental health system, we coupled empirically based didactic trainings with ongoing skills-based coaching and mentoring of provider staff at clinic sites. Several targeted DMH providers are the focus of training and TA services, including older adult providers, adolescent providers, those working on integrated mental health primary care, substance abuse service teams, and those providing services to criminal justice populations. Our training and TA formats range from large (600+ person) conferences, small skill-building trainings, webinars, consulting, and clinical supervision and coaching, with the mission of helping professional staff better understand addiction, its co-occurrence with mental illness, and evidence-based interventions to best treat those suffering from dual-disorders. For more information, please visit http://www.uclaisap.org/dmhcod/index.html.

Co-Occurring Disorder Training Program was funded by the Los Angeles County Department of Mental Health, contracts MH010054 and MH010089, from July 2010 to June 2013.


Los Angeles SBIRT Network

Timothy Fong, M.D., Director (tfong@mednet.ucla.edu)
Sheryl Kataoka, MD, Co-Director (skataoka@mednet.ucla.edu)
Thomas Freese, Ph.D., Director of Training (tfreese@mednet.ucla.edu)
Mary Olson, Project Director (molson@mednet.ucla.edu)

The Los Angeles SBIRT (Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment) Network will develop, implement, and evaluate SBIRT training for students from medical residencies, nursing, social work, and counseling schools throughout the Los Angeles area. Students will implement SBIRT practices during their clinical rotations, which will lay the foundation for them to incorporate SBIRT into their career. First, SBIRT training materials from previous medical residency cooperative agreements will be modified to be discipline specific and will be tailored to local treatment services. Second, SBIRT students will participate in the Los Angeles SBIRT Learning Community, a network of addiction treatment professionals, school administrators, healthcare professionals, and community advocates. This community will provide clinical supervision, feedback, and discussion and is a forum to exchange ideas on how to enhance the delivery of SBIRT practices. Third, participants in the Los Angeles SBIRT Network will be invited to attend the annual Los Angeles SBIRT Summit, a multidisciplinary conference to be held with stakeholders from around Los Angeles, with the purpose of bringing the latest research and practice to providers to enhance SBIRT knowledge and skills. Finally, students who are trained in SBIRT will become mentors to later cohorts of students who are eligible for SBIRT training. This will create a culture where SBIRT training becomes permanently integrated into the curriculum of each individual school. The end result of the activities of the LA SBIRT Network will be to significantly increase the quality of care for patients with substance use disorders.  For additional information, please visit http://www.lasbirt.com/ or https://worldofsbirt.wordpress.com/.

Los Angeles SBIRT Network was funded by the UCLA Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, grant U79T1025410, from October 2013 to September 2016.


Orange County Health Care Agency –
Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral
to Treatment (SBIRT) Training Program

Thomas Freese, Ph.D., Principal Investigator
(tfreese@mednet.ucla.edu)
Sherry Larkins, Ph.D. Co-Investigator & Project Director (larkins@ucla.edu)

This 1-year training and technical assistance project focused on skill and knowledge development of the Orange County Health Care Agency (OCHCA) adolescent mental health and addiction treatment workforce to ensure providers are delivering more integrated and capable care for those with co-occurring disorders. Under the statewide INNOVATIONS programs, counties have Mental Health Services Act funds to experiment with the integration of mental health, addiction, and primary care services. OCHCA contracted with UCLA ISAP to provide overview trainings on: (1)  current drug use trends among youth, (2) how various substances affect the brain and behavior of adolescents, (3) how to screen for substance use using evidence-based screening instruments, and (4) how to conduct brief interventions and refer to specialty care when needed (SBIRT). Trainings were followed-up with on-site targeted skill-building and coaching for staff responsible for implementing SBIRT at community mental health clinics across the county.

Screening, Brief Intervention and Referral to Treatment was funded by the Orange County Health Care Agency, from June 2012 to May 2013.


Substance Abuse Research Consortium State Contract

Thomas E. Freese, Ph.D., Principal Investigator
(tfreese@mednet.ucla.edu)
Beth Rutkowski, M.P.H., Project Director

The Substance Abuse Research Consortium (SARC) meetings offer an opportunity for professionals from a variety of disciplines to exchange current information on California substance use disorders trends, promising prevention and treatment strategies, criminal justice and social service partnerships, and other substance use disorders-related topics. The target audiences for these meetings include substance use disorders researchers, treatment providers, administrators, policymakers, and other individuals interested in substance use disorders research- and policy-related issues. Meetings were conducted on June 4, 2012 (Sacramento, CA) and June 6, 2012 (Los Angeles, CA), on the topic of past, present, and future trends in substance use disorder treatment services in California, and on September 11-12, 2013 (Sacramento, CA), on the topic of workforce development needs for the California-based substance use disorder treatment and recovery field. The SARC contract also provides partial funding for the California Addiction Training and Education Series (refer to the CATES summary above for additional details). Additional products completed under the SARC contract include white papers on a variety of topics, including Assessing the Quality of Care for Substance Use Disorder Conditions – Implications for the State of California, and California Substance Use Disorder Workforce Development. Additional information is available at www.psattc.org.

SARC State Contract was funded by the State of California, Department of Alcohol and Drug Programs, Contract 10-00130 (October 2010 through September 2014).


The Pacific Southwest Addiction
Technology Transfer Center

Thomas E. Freese, Ph.D., Principal Investigator
(tfreese@mednet.ucla.edu)
Richard A. Rawson, Ph.D., Co-Investigator
(rrawson@mednet.ucla.edu)
Thomas E. Freese, Ph.D., Michael S. Shafer, Ph.D., & Nancy Roget, M.A., Project Directors
Beth Rutkowski, M.P.H., Associate Director of Training

The Pacific Southwest Addiction Technology Transfer Center (HHS Region 9, Pacific Southwest ATTC) provides training, acquires and shares information, and promotes incorporation of empirically based substance use disorders practices into treatment. In order to help community service providers to efficiently produce optimum outcomes, the main work of the Pacific Southwest ATTC is to disseminate knowledge about state-of-the-art treatment practices and their delivery. In fall 2012, the Pacific Southwest ATTC region was expanded to include Arizona, California, Hawaii, Nevada, American Samoa, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Guam, Republic of the Marshall Islands, and Republic of Palau. Drawing on research conducted by UCLA ISAP, a major focus of Pacific Southwest ATTC work has been to educate providers about the impact of methamphetamine (MA) use and effective treatment strategies for MA-dependent individuals. Additional key topics include: screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT); co-occurring mental and substance abuse disorders;  NIATx process improvement strategies to increase access to and engagement and retention in treatment; the integration of substance use, mental health, and primary care services; and medication-assisted treatments for opioid and alcohol addiction (specifically methadone, buprenorphine, and naltrexone). The Pacific Southwest ATTC works to promote changes in attitudes across all involved settings in the Pacific Southwest (including academic and government agencies, as well as among clinicians involved in treating those with substance use disorders) regarding the status of the field, the need to increase cultural competence among substance use disorders treatment professionals, the need for greater interaction among stakeholders, and the need for more training for substance use disorders treatment professionals. The Pacific Southwest ATTC, led by ISAP in partnership with faculty from Arizona State University (ASU) and the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR), provides an exemplary resource and an extraordinary array of expertise and experience in training, evaluation, and distance learning techniques for substance use disorders professionals. The combination of the ISAP, ASU, and UNR groups, along with key stakeholders, consultants, and community organization partners in Arizona and California, creates an extraordinary resource to meet the extensive and rapidly evolving training and technology transfer needs of the field. (Additional information is available at: www.psattc.org.)

The Pacific Southwest Addiction Technology Transfer Center is funded by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration / Center for Substance Abuse Treatment, grant 5 UD1 TI24242, from March 2002 through September 2017.


Vietnam HIV-Addiction Technology
Transfer Center: VHATTC

Richard A. Rawson, Ph.D., Principal Investigator (rrawson@mednet.ucla.edu)
Valerie Pearce Antonini, M.P.H., Project Director

Vietnam has been experiencing an HIV epidemic due, in large part, to injection drug use.  Ongoing training and workforce development in the areas of substance use disorders (SUDs) and HIV is needed.  An organizational resource for workforce development used in the United States for over 15 years, the Addiction Technology Transfer Center [ATTC]), is being translated and applied in Vietnam (Vietnam HIV-ATTC). The VH-ATTC was established in September 2011 at Hanoi Medical University (HMU) as a vehicle to disseminate evidence-based SUD and HIV treatment and prevention practices. Through this mechanism, training for counselors and medical professionals is conducted; partnerships between HMU, government and NGO leaders, policymakers, and health professionals have been developed; and the promotion of principles of harm reduction and recovery-oriented systems of care are emphasized. The VH-ATTC will draw upon the expertise of the U.S. ATTC as well as the tremendous amount of training and advocacy work conducted by HMU, Family Health International (FHI), the World Health Organization (WHO), and the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC).  At the close of its 3rd year of implementation, the VH-ATTC at HMY has established an accepted identity as a key training and technical assistance resource among the organizations delivering SUD and HIV services and governmental agencies in Vietnam.  For more information, visit http://vhattc.org/.

Vietnam HIV-Addiction Technology Transfer Center: VHATTC was funded by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, grant 1 UD1 TI023603, from September 2011 to February 2015.

Last Updated:  11/25/2015

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2016 ISAP Publications
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