Researchers' Profiles

Stacy Calhoun, Ph.D.

Stacy Calhoun, Ph.D.

Principal Investigator

Stacy Calhoun, Ph.D., is a researcher at the UCLA Integrated Substance Abuse Programs with over 17 years of experience in behavioral health and criminal justice research. She currently has funding to evaluate a mindfulness-based program for individuals incarcerated in California prisons and funding to evaluate a universal physical and behavioral health screening program for high school students through the Compton Unified School District/California Department of Education. She previously served as a project director on several federally funded clinical trials, including an assessment of gender-responsive treatment in drug court settings, a comparison of telepsychiatry to standard psychiatric services in a parole setting, and the impact of a rechargeable incentive card on the follow-up rates of substance abuse treatment clients. She has published articles on gender responsive treatment for justice-involved women, trauma-informed violence prevention programming for women, re-entry planning for parolees, prevention for at-risk youth and psychiatric treatment for justice-involved individuals with mental illness. She is also the literature editor for the Sex Offender Law Report and the Juvenile Justice Update where she writes a column for each publication that highlights current findings from the literature for a practitioner audience.

  • University of California, Los Angeles, B.A., Anthropology, 1997
  • Case Western Reserve University, M.A., Medical Anthropology, 2000
  • University of California, Irvine, Ph.D., Criminology, Law & Society, 2016
  • University of California, Los Angeles, NIDA T32 Postdoctoral Fellowship, Addiction Health Services Research, 2016-2018
  • Mindfulness in correctional settings
  • Mental illness and substance use disorders among justice-involved individuals
  • Trauma-informed programming
  • Reentry and diversion programs
  • Integrated models of physical/behavioral health care for youth
  1. Farabee, D., Knight, K., Garner, B., & Calhoun, S. (2007). The Inmate Pre-Release Assessment (IPASS) for re-entry planning. Criminal Justice & Behavior, 34(9), 1188-1197.
  2. Calhoun, S., Messina, N., Cartier, J. & Torres, S. (2010). Implementing gender responsive treatment for women in prison: Client and staff perspectives. Federal Probation 74(3), 27-33.
  3. Messina, N., Calhoun, S., & Warda, U. (2012). Gender-responsive drug court treatment: A randomized controlled trial. Criminal Justice & Behavior, 39(12), 1539-1558.
  4. Messina, N., Calhoun, S., & Braithwaite, J. (2014). Trauma-informed treatment decreases PTSD among women offenders. Journal of Trauma & Dissociation, 15(1), 6-23.
  5. Calhoun, S., Conner, E., Miller, M., & Messina, N. (2015). Improving the outcomes of children affected by parental substance abuse: A review of randomized controlled trials. Substance Abuse and Rehabilitation, 6(1), 15-24.
  6. Calhoun, S. & Epson, M. (2016). Integrating substance use disorder treatment with general mental health treatment in jail settings can improve mental health, treat drug use, and produce better criminal justice outcomes. UC Criminal Justice & Health Consortium, 1(5), 1-4.
  7. Farabee, D., Calhoun, S., & Veliz, R. (2016) An Experimental Comparison of Telepsychiatry and Conventional Psychiatry for Mentally Ill Parolees. Psychiatric Services, 67(5), 562-565.
  8. Farabee, D., Hawken, A., Calhoun, S., Veliz, R., Grossman, J., & Zhang, Y. (2016) Tracking and locating itinerant subjects with a rechargeable incentive card: Results from a randomized control trial. Substance Use and Misuse, 51(5), 658-663.
  9. Messina, N., Braithwaite, J., Calhoun, S., & Kubiak, S. (2016) Examination of a Violence Prevention Program for Female Offenders. Violence and Gender, 3(3), 143-149.
  10. Calhoun, S. (2018). "That's just the tip of it because it goes deeper than that": The role of mental illness in offending onset and subsequent offending behavior. Criminal Justice Policy Review, 29(4), 341-364.
  11. Calhoun, S. (2018) The clinician–patient working alliance: Is it a significant predictor of psychiatric medication adherence in a sample of recently released parolees? The Journal of Forensic Psychiatry & Psychology 29(5), 782-793.